Posts Tagged ‘power of three’

How the Power of Three Works with Business Processes

Every organization from the single office/home office (SOHO) entrepreneur to the multiple location large business have business processes or systems. Some are clearly identified and some are not especially for those under 100 employees.

business-processesOnce again the power of three emerges within business processes. The three key areas are:

  1. Quality Leadership
  2. Measurement
  3. Results

Quality leadership is what makes everything work to the best of its potential from people to actual physical operations.  This forward thinking leadership continually support internal customer satisfaction leading to those moments of truth or points of connection with external customers.

Measurement must always be present because what gets measured gets done as the old expression goes. Failure to measure reduces quality from leadership to actual solutions being produced. Additionally measurement sets expectations and more importantly an attitude of personal accountability.

Results are the outputs from the various processes. These should be predetermined with established benchmarks as well as key performance indicators to ensure the results are on track to being achieved.

When we think in the power of three, this is much easier for our brains to remember and make other critical cognitive connections. If your small business to even much larger organization is having business processes issues such as late deliveries, people turnover, etc.,  then first look to the quality of your executive leadership before embarking on some drastic actions that may not solve the problems and only drain your pocketbook.

Leanne Hoagland-Smith is a heurist who disrupts the status quo by discovering new ways to guide and support rapidly growing small businesses; those who wish to grow beyond their current employees and executives in chaos.  She is recognized as one of the Top 25 Sales Influencers in 2013 by Open View Sales Labs and can be reached at 219.759.5601 CST.

 

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How the Power of Three Develops a People First High Performance Culture

People (employees) are what make any organization run and are responsible for business growth. Their productivity is what creates and sustains a high performance culture which in turns spawns customer loyalty. Yet, in so many instances, people come last or come as a secondary thought to business growth.

high-performance-cultureA discussion over at LinkedIn asked this question: What comes first, customers or employees?  Currently, approximately 75% of those who have responded believe employees come first. There is a general attitude if you take care of the employees, they will take care of the customers. This attitude has been demonstrated by companies such as Southwest Airlines among others.

Within this people focus, the power of three once again emerges. There are three key areas that support a people first high performance culture.

  • Development
  • Measurement
  • Results

Development goes beyond the basic skill training required to ensure alignment to the strategies and processes. To be a high performance culture (right environment), development works to ensure the right people are in the right seats using the right talents to make the right decisions within the right time frame to ensure the right results.

Measurement is always present as people work together to achieve the predetermined goals. With employee productivity research indicating around 25% of the workforce gives 8 for 8 (8 hours of work for 8 hours of pay) while 50% give less than 8 for 8 and 25% gives less than 6 for 8, measurement is critical. High performing employees do not want their efforts supporting those who are not high performing. Eventually, even the best employees will either reduced their productivity or will leave if they believe the workplace environment is working against them.

Results are what counts. Many small businesses to even larger firms continue to have challenges in securing the desired results. The reasons vary. However by focusing on people first as the driver for business growth, my sense is this would stabilize the fluctuations in results.

A high performance culture can be achieved by understanding people, employees, must come first. Then by embracing development, measurement and results sustainable business growth will be achieved. And isn’t that the essence of a high performance culture?

Leanne Hoagland-Smith is a heurist who disrupts the status quo by discovering new ways to guide and support rapidly growing small businesses; those who wish to grow beyond their current employees and executives in chaos.  She is recognized as one of the Top 25 Sales Influencers in 2013 by Open View Sales Labs and can be reached at 219.759.5601 CST.

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How The Power of Three Inspires a High Performance Culture

Imagine for a moment an organization where a high performance culture happens day in and day out. These united individuals work together and thus develop into very loyal internal customers (employees) who know how the firm makes and keeps money. This shared and applied knowledge then creates those points of connections or moments of truth where external customers are touched and touched again to become loyal customers.

high-performance-cultureWould this business regardless of size experienced consistent business growth?

Would it be profitable?

Would there be less of those daily hassles, challenges and stress?

So where does one start to develop such a high performance culture. The answer lies within the power of three:

People

Processes (Systems)

Strategies (Strategy)

By using the power of three, organizational development and business growth are now viewed working together to reinforce a high performance culture instead of being two separate entities that sometimes appear to work against each other. People become an integral part of the overall process and not a sub set or after thought.

To better understand this power of three  model and how it does work to support a high performance culture,  each area of people, processes and strategies will be explored during the next several days. Remember,  simplicity should not be confused with something being easy. With this being said, by having clarity around just three areas within any small business to much larger organization does provide the foundation for sustainable business growth.

Leanne Hoagland-Smith is a heurist who disrupts the status quo by discovering new ways to guide and support rapidly growing small businesses; those who wish to grow beyond their current employees and executives in chaos.  She is recognized as one of the Top 25 Sales Influencers in 2013 by Open View Sales Labs and can be reached at 219.759.5601 CST.

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The Simplicity of Business Growth through the Power of Three – Part 2

After simplifying the various stages of business growth into just three stages through the power of three, then it is time to examine how to further simplify the strategic planning process.

power -of-three

Many executive consultants to small business coaches will discuss “critical goal categories” or “critical success factors.” These categories or factors may be simply defined as “what is necessary and sufficient to achieve the mission or current goals” for the enterprise.

Recently when reviewing many of the strategic plans of my clients, I realized once again the power of three even though in past years I had written about the Top 7 Critical Goal Categories. For all of the various identified critical success factors could be placed into one of these three categories:

  • People
  • Processes
  • Profits

The power of three allows simplification and thus frees up time that can be better invested in detailing the action steps to identifying Strengths, Limitations, Opportunities, or Threats (SLOT) to  executing the plan.

Running a small business from the strategic planning process to the day to day operations can become very complicated. By embracing the power of three attitude, allows the opportunity to shed some of those complexities and affords you additional time to do what you do best.

If you want to further your competitive advantage, this webinar – LinkedIn Contacts Your Competitive Advantage – on Thursday, June 27 from 10-11 am might be of interest to you.  At an affordable $9.97 and just 60 minutes of your time, you will learn not only about this recent update, but some other tips to have you standing out as the Red Jacket and not just another gray suit.  Register here.

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The Simplicity of Business Growth Through the Power of Three – Part 1

Business growth is usually predicated upon revenue. Yet for many small business owners, there appears to be revenue walls that suddenly materialize and are hard to overcome.  Possibly this is because traditional business growth model needs to be changed along with how to begin the strategic planning process.

power-of-three

What would happen if the number of employees was the initial catalyst to business growth?

Stage One – Turned On – One to Four Employees

Many call the first stage Start Up and yet this terms fails to embrace the mental and physical energy of the entrepreneur that must translate to the employees.  In this stage, the entrepreneur is truly “turned on” by his or her idea and looks to transfer that energy to both external customers (paying clients) and potentially soon to be hired internal customers (employees).

Stage Two – Transitional – Five to 19 Employees

In this second stage of business growth, the small business owner is transitioning from opening the doors, sharing the message into the vision of having a larger firm. To reach this stage he or she has faced and overcome the chaos of change where everything including the kitchen sink continues to be thrown at him or her. New employees are hired to close specific skill, experience or competency gaps.

Stage Three – Transformational – 20 to 45 Employees

The final stage is transformational where this is no longer a one or two person business, but a thriving enterprise where collaboration continually happens. Now employees are hired because of their fit with the culture and their “entrepreneurial spirit.” This third and final business growth stage happens only after the small business owner lets go of past practices because what propelled him to the second stage will not necessarily work in this third business growth stage.

As to how to begin the strategic planning process, consider the creation of an Asset Model.  Here the entrepreneur looks through the three key critical success factors of people, process and profit as asset groups.  Many small business owners fails to understand the assets they bring before they physically open the doors and this potentially sets the course for the establishment of revenue walls down the road.

With more and more compliances being thrust onto small businesses, possibly now is the time to leverage the power of three especially if you desire to stay under 50 employees and truly want to avoid those often reached revenue walls.

Leanne Hoagland-Smith is a heurist who disrupts the status quo by discovering new ways to guide and support rapidly growing small businesses; those who wish to grow beyond their current employees and executives in chaos.  She can be reached at 219.759.5601 CST.

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How to MagicallyTurn Your Whitepaper into an Emotionally Engaging Sales Pitch

Visit many websites and you will come across the infamous whitepaper. This usually downloadable document tells a story (think sales pitch) about how a company’s solution helped one of their clients. Given the limited time of most website visitors, the majority of whitepapers are one to two pages in length and cover these three topics:

sales-pitch

  1. The client’s situation
  2. The solution developed and executed
  3. The results and subsequent return on investment

Now image in you could magically turn your whitepaper into an emotionally engaging sales pitch that would explain what happened in six, yes just six sequential sentences, what would that mean for you:

  • More interested prospects?
  • More qualified potential ideal customers?
  • More increase sales?

If you are thinking, that can’t be done, then you are your own worst enemy because yes it can be done and the added benefit this exercise is fun.

In the book, To Sell Is Human, by Daniel Pink, he described the Pixar sales pitch where you essentially rendered down a whitepaper into six sequential sentences. (Note: Daniel Pink does not use the term whitepaper that is my synthesis of this activity.)

Here is how it goes.

#1 – Once upon a time …

#2 – Every day …

#3 – One day …

#4 – Because of that …

#5 – Because of that …

#6 – Until finally…

If you wish to read an example, visit my LinkedIn profile and read the summary.

Beyond rendering your whitepaper into just six sequential sentences, Pink has also employed the Power of Three with the two “because of that” and the one “until finally.”

Remember people hear words and think in pictures. If you can intentionally craft a picture in an emotionally engaging way, as once upon a time, then are you further ahead of any past sales pitch you might have used. Do you not sound different than all those other sales pitches? And to Be the Red Jacket requires differentiation from that first encounter.

 

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The Power of Three

power-of-threeThree is a powerful number.  Travel back through history and this number appears in so many cultures. Even today’s culture, the power of three (3) is present such as:

  • I will count to 3, 1, 2, 3
  • A, B, C
  • Father, Son and Holy Spirit
  • Primary colors – red, yellow, blue
  • Axiology – Systems, intrinsic, or extrinsic thinkers
  • H2O – the 3 molecules of water

Possibly the reason for the power of three is because it is easy to remember.  When we can render the complex down to its simplest elements or components, this action makes understanding much easier.

Whether is it in business or in life especially in today’s hectic and jam packed world, finding the simplicity in all of he complexity reduces stress and increases our own happiness.

Yes life is indeed complex and sometimes necessarily so because the complexity was created outside of our control. So the next time you are presented with a new complex challenge or reworking an old one, determine if you can render it down to 3 main categories or buckets. Who knows how you will benefit from the power of three?

Leanne Hoagland-Smith is a heurist who disrupts the status quo by discovering new ways to guide and support rapidly growing small businesses or those who wish to grow beyond their current employees as well as executives in chaos.  She can be reached at 219.759.5601 CST.

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