Why Not Consider Time as an Investment instead of a Cost?

How much time will that cost me?

time-as-an-investmentHave you ever heard or even thought that question?

Time once gone is gone, never to return again

Yes, it is a cost when you have not realized what you wanted to achieve.

Yes, it is a cost when you do not know what you want to achieve.

Yes, it is a cost when you have a mentality of scarcity instead of abundance.

Marcel Proust wrote “”The true voyage of discovery is not seeking new landscapes, but seeing with new eyes.”

When you consider time as an investment, the same landscape of 1,400 minutes or 86,400 seconds look differently.

Time management is an oxymoron because no one can manage a constant.

Time management is really self management or self leadership.

You have 100% control of how you manage yourself within each 24 hours.

The can’t do because I do not have time now because yes I can do because I will make time.

You now have a mentality of abundance instead of scarcity.

You can lay in bed to grab a few extra winks or get up and get an early start.

Most people admit to wasting 12 minutes a day just at work.

The time and productivity research suggests over an hour of time is wasted daily at work.

Twelve minutes equal one hour a week or 52 hours a year.

Imagine just for a moment what you could do when you consider time as an investment instead of a cost?

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith is THE People and Process Problem Solver. She supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

 

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The Wearing What Hat Reality Drains Small Business Owners

With over 70% of all US businesses being non-employed (entrepreneurs without employees) and 97.7% of all businesses being under 20 employes, a recent survey (Sixth Annual Brother International Small Business) of small business owners revealed they are truly drained by all the hats they wear. I can personally attest to that fact. (Source: U.S. Census Bureau)

small-business-owners

Just One Day in the Life of a Small Business Owner

Yesterday I invested time to learn about some the impact of assessments specific to talent management,  organizational alignment to increased profits through better employee hiring and workplace engagement. Then I attended a business to business networking event and an association meeting specific to family owned small businesses and governance (the process of transitioning the small business from one generation to the other). In between I worked with a client; answered email and engaged in social media marketing. The day began at 4:30 am and ended at 9:20pm. On the go for 19 hours makes for a long day. This morning I am tired and off at 7:30am to meet with a client.

Working IN the Business versus On the Business

Years ago the E Myth by Michael Gerber brought to light this phrase of “working IN the business instead of working ON the business.” From Brother’s research, this problem still exists by the wearing of all these hats.  The good news is many small businesses owners appear to recognize this problem with the number one response (35%) being “taking on too many roles and responsibilities.”

Additionally these time strapped small business owners shared if given a 5% increase in revenue, 41% would invest in technology because that would help with wearing all the hats.  Investing in their people came in much lower. Since this survey was of 500 small business owners with under 100 employees and not knowing how many were sole entrepreneurs, one cannot make any presumptions about technology versus people.

From my experience, small business owners usually do not invest in their people even though their people run the technology and others processes that make the organization hum. This disconnect creates much of the internal workflow and productivity barriers (people and process problems)  faced by these small business owners.

The Necessity of a Strategic Plan

Finally as I have written numerous times before, much of the problem with all the hat wearing could be resolved through a written and clearly articulated strategic plan.  There still is far too much Captain Wing It behaviors and plan, less alone strategic plan, remains a four letter dirty word for many small business owners.

Time is one aspect of business that once it is gone, it is gone. By investing the time to determine what hats we really need to wear; what hats can be worn just sometimes thanks to technology and what hats could be worn by others, will separate those small business owners who thrive from those who just continue to barely survive.

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FREE Download of the Leadership-Change-Audit to begin identifying why you continue to wear all those hats.

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith is THE People and Process Problem Solver. She supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

 

 

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Are Your Leadership Skills Revealed Through Your Prospecting?

Have you ever considered how your prospecting actions actually reveal your leadership skills?  For me sales is all about leadership. Any activities such as prospecting within the 3 Phase Sales Process have always been in alignment with my leadership skills.

leadership-skillsSocial media has provided an incredible opportunity for savvy salespeople to unite their prospecting skills with their leadership skills. Unfortunately, most fail to recognize this reality.

If people buy from people they know and trust (First Sales Buying Rule), then top sales performers will build relationships through social media as they prospect. Leveraging their leadership skills they will cultivate the relationship first with their prospect to learn if the prospect is truly a qualified ideal customer.

What they will not do is to make a sales pitch for a recommendation with a complete stranger. For example, this morning through the social media site of LinkedIn, I received this email from a second degree connection who truly sounded desperate.

Hi Leanne,
I hope you’re having a good week. I noticed that we share a common group. I wanted to reach out to you to see if you knew of anyone that needs a new website, a marketing or overview video for their existing website, or needs sales leads for their business.

If so, could you refer them to my client? Could you also send them a link to their website (website’s link)? Examples of their work can be found on the home page. You can also forward (her client’s name) email address for any questions. Any referrals would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks and have an outstanding day.

Beyond being dumbfounded by her prospecting skills  and curious as to whom taught her this foolhardy approach, her prospecting outreach truly demonstrated a lack of some essential leadership skills. For me leadership is defined as the ability to secure results using clearly articulated and consistent positive core values. She might as well just stood on a corner with a sign or stick flyers on the windshields’ of cars.

The ability to secure results through this type of prospecting has to be close to zero if she is reaching out to anyone with business experience.

Who would recommend a stranger based upon the recommendations of a stranger?

Additionally two days ago I received an email from another second degree LinkedIn connection who was making a sales pitch about considering his psychometric assessment.  His initial email left me cold because I did not know him. From reading his sales pitch email, he truly did not read my profile, but was going on search terms.

In spite of sending him an emotionally intelligent and short response, he returned with another sales pitch essentially with “Just try it, you’ll like it.” Again, I thanked him and said no thanks. His third email sales pitch of “Just try it, you’ll like it” included a sample of the psychometric assessment. A quick glance told me it did not serve my clients any better than the three (3) foundational talent assessments I use all published by Innermetrix:

Now he was annoying me and even though I responded politely, this is one individual as well as one firm I would never ever recommend or ever consider using.

To increase sales requires exceptional prospecting skills that work with outstanding leadership skills. To make sales pitches or ask for recommendations from almost complete strangers demonstrate these individuals are 100% clueless as to the overall sales process. The thought of building mutually beneficial relationships is not even being considered.

Again, who would consider a sales pitch from a complete stranger?

Today’s small business coaching tip is just because you are connected on LinkedIn or any other social media site does not mean that person knows and trusts you. Prospecting works far better when united with great leadership skills including high business ethics.

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith is THE People and Process Problem Solver. She supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

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Self-Leadership First, Leadership Second For Top Sales Performers

Fact: Everyone is in sales regardless if it is in your title or directly reflect your paycheck. Since everyone is in sales, then those who are the top sales performers know self-leadership comes first and leadership second.

self-leadershipIf you cannot lead yourself first and foremost, how can you lead others?

Now those others you may be leading could be:

  • External customers
  • Internal customers
  • Vendors
  • Center of influence
  • Community members
  • Family
  • Friends

As of just late 2014, Deloitte in their Global Human Capital Trends once again indicated leadership is a critical respective to organizations pipelines (up and coming leaders). For without strong and effective leadership, firms will no longer be ahead of the flow, but rather behind it. Talk about not being able to open a jar of pickles.

Having worked with young people to develop both self leadership and leadership skills (Career and College Success Boot Camp), I recognize self-leadership development must happen in middle school and for certain high school.  Very few K-12 schools have any formal leadership development.  One of the exceptions is Culver Military Academy where self-leadership begins in the freshman year and thereafter each year expands with ongoing development until full leadership (leading others) happens at the senior year.

FACT #1: Leadership development in corporate America begins at age 42 (Source: Harvard Business Review, Jack Zenger)

FACT #2: The majority of full time college students (possible future leaders) fail self-leadership because they cannot earn a 4 year degree in 4 years.

FACT #3: Far too many people confuse being actively engaged in community projects as leadership. This is usually just free labor.

These three facts alone only reaffirm that we have a self-leadership crisis in life, business and especially in sales.

Those leaders who realize they must lead themselves first will become the top sales performers because they understand the value of:

If your firm wants top sales performers, then an investment must be made to ensure that result.  Any sales training must be self-leadership based first and foremost.  The focus on only sales skills is a short term solution and in many cases those sales skills do not include this skill of communicating through the written word.

Yes sales is all about leadership and truly is about self-leadership.  The sooner small businesses recognize and accept that fact, the sooner they will begin to increase sales and move ahead of the flow.

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith is THE People and Process Problem Solver. She supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

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Knowing the Motivation to Sell Is the First Key In Hiring Top Sales Performers

motivation-to-sellHiring sales people is very much like a crap shoot.  Finding those top sales performers you require to increase sales is even more of a gamble. What might make your hiring easier is to discover the applicant’s desire or motivation to sell. Yet where do you find that in your hiring process? Even with the strongest resumes and references, the motivation to sell is hidden from those in sales management.

So what can a time strapped small business owner to sales manager do to discover and then separate those top sales performers (the red jackets)  from everyone else (gray suits)?

Have you ever heard of the Values Index?

This quick psychometric and talent assessment can quickly determine if the applicant has the motivation to sell through the identification of 7 key dimensions of value and motivation.

The History

This very reliable psychometric assessment is built upon the works of German philosopher and psychologist Eduard Spranger and American psychologist Gordon Allport. How this assessment differs from other talent assessments is it is concerned about people’s convictions. Allport believed an individual’s personality is founded upon people’s values or basic convictions they hold about what is and is not of real importance in life. He used Spranger’s findings to outline six major value types.

  • Aesthetic – Form and harmony
  • Economic – Usefulness
  • Political – Power and control (leadership)*
  • Social – Love of people
  • Religious – Unity
  • Theoretical – Search for knowledge, truth

*Spranger replaced Political with Individualistic to keep the six dimensions.

The Present

Innermetrix realized that Political from Spranger and Individualistic from Allport need not be mutually exclusive. Also, to comply with EEOC, mention of religion is not favorable.  The publisher Innermetrix has substituted regulatory with religious. The present Values Index has seven dimensions instead of six.

  • Aesthetic (Original) – Balance, Form and harmony
  • Altruistic (Spranger’s Social) – Humanitarian efforts
  • Economic (Original) – Economic or practical returns
  • Individualistic (Allport’s) – Independence and uniqueness (Self-Leadership)
  • Political (Spranger’s) – Control or have influence (Leadership)
  • Regulatory (Spranger’s religious) – Establish order, routine and structure
  • Theoretical (Original)- Search for knowledge, learning and understanding

The Results

From the works of others and myself, an economic driver in the top 50% indicates the motivation to sell is present. Additionally those applicants with a high altruistic driver and a low economic driver may be more concerned about building relationships and earning the sale is third or fourth on the list of their own motivational needs.

Having an economic driver in the lower 50% does not mean the salesperson cannot be a top sales performer. What it does mean is the salesperson must be aware of that lower value of dimension.

Also if the culture of the organization is not forward thinking or toxic, even salespeople with the highest economic drivers will not be successful. This assessment helps to quickly identify the potential of hiring tops sales performers respective to the motivation to sell.

This assessment tool, the Values Index, like many other assessments benefits when debriefed by a certified consultant.  Even though value type assessments are available for free, employing these “freebies” may be harmful to the organization without understanding the results from both an individual and organizations (team) perspective.

Remember, hiring is an investment when done well and a cost when not done well. 

Making an investment of $100 to even $250 ensures you are hiring those with a motivation to sell is money well spent.

Invest Just $97 and Save Thousands by Identifying The Motivation to Sell

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith is THE People and Process Problem Solver. She supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

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The Rarity of Permission Based Marketing

Maybe it is just me, yet it appears that permission based marketing is becoming as rare as the Dodo bird. Years to even months ago I would receive one unsolicited newsletter or broadcast email a week.  Now, I am receiving them daily and the worst offenders appear to come from one social media site – LinkedIn.

permission-based-marketingJust this morning I received a newsletter from a first degree LinkedIn connection who added my email to his list without my permission.  Then I received two sales pitches from second degree LinkedIn connections who indicated we were connected on LinkedIn. Last week  my LinkedIn email box had over 10 different “sales pitch” emails.

My problem with those who fail to understand permission based marketing is two-fold:

  • Respect
  • Time

When we ask for permission to include people on our various lists, we are demonstrating positive business ethics through respect.  Adding people to your list because you have their email is just plain rude and disrespectful.  As Jane Addams observed:

“Action indeed is the sole medium of expression for ethics.”

Then there is the issue of time.  Time is a constant of 24 hours.  Every second taken away from busy small business owners, executives to sales professionals keeps them from doing what they need to do.

Presumptions cannot be made about many of these emails because the subject line appears to be relevant such as “We’re connected on LinkedIn.”   Possibly a few moments after reading the email, the reader recognizes another “sales pitch.” However he or she may have some confusion as to who the sender is.  Then some additional time is wasted checking out whether this is a first degree connection or another second or third degree connection using email marketing without permission.

To elevate your small business above the noise from those other gray suits does require effective marketing.  Your email marketing must be in alignment with your business ethics and social media marketing etiquette. Sure there are few hard fast rules about email marketing unless you are concerned about the SPAM code and violations.

Permission based marketing reflects these wise words of Wayne Dyer:

“Live one day at a time emphasizing ethics rather than rules.”

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Check out Be The Red Jacket the Keys to Unlocking Sales Success.

This quick read begins by discussing the importance of business ethics.

Leanne Hoagland-Smith supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. She speaks and writes specifically to high performance sales people who require a tailored executive coaching solution and to small businesses with under 50 employees where the challenges are more unique and resources more limited. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

 

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The Misidentification of Small Business Problems Continues

Small business problems fall into one of two categories:

small-business-problems

  • People
  • Process

Unfortunately, many leaders misidentify these small business problems as symptoms. For example, last week in speaking with an executive director, he indicated communication was his greatest barrier to organizational success.  As our conversation continued and he shared additional information, I said to him:

“From what you have shared, communication is a symptom of both an ineffective process and people who have failed to understand the mission of your department.  This suggests the real problem of misalignment between people and processes.”  After several quiet moments, he looked at me and said “You are right. I never thought from that perspective.”

Every week, I receive at least one call from small business owners who have a “sales problem.”  Upon further discussion, the inability to increase sales is not the real problem, but a symptom of usually both a people and process problem.

The people problem could be just one or many such as:

  • Having the wrong people in the wrong seats
  • Poor to ineffective management (promoting super workers to supervisors syndrome)
  • The desire for the quick fix

As to process, this too could be because of:

  • No sales process
  • Misalignment between sales and other departments
  • Confusion because of the lack of a strategic planning process

Addressing symptoms is what a lot of business consulting and business coaches do.  This is why the small business problems are never solved and continue to feed the revenue stream for these same consulting and coaching firms.

The authors of Fail-Safe Leadership addressed the reality of misalignment in their forward thinking book. This quick read was published over 10 years ago. Now some noted organizational to sales experts are stating what these authors shared many years ago.

Learn more about Fail-Safe Leadership

Misalignment can be found at the feet of leadership. How many organizational consultants or business coaches will tell the person who is hiring them, “You are the problem or rather your leadership is the problem?”

The resistance to tell the truth is why misidentification of small business problems continue. No one wants to tell the emperor (the small business owner or C-Suite executive) you are the problem.

If you want to achieve sustainable business growth, then determine the real small business problems you are facing.  Find someone who will provide you with truthful feedback (in an emotionally intelligent manner) and has the experience to work with you to overcome those people and process problems.

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. She speaks and writes specifically to high performance sales people who require a tailored executive coaching solution and to small businesses with under 50 employees where the challenges are more unique and resources more limited. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

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The Tiresome I Don’t Do Free Sales Obstacle

Small business owners to survive and ultimately thrive must increase sales.  Sometimes, they receive advice to give away their solutions for “free” as an incentive to gain credibility or build trust.  Unfortunately, this marketing strategy may lead to their target market expecting free and creates the “I don’t do free” sales obstacle.

sales-obstacle

Credit: Gosser Corp Sales

During a discussion at the Southshore Business Networking, a local B2b networking and mastermind group here in Northwest Indiana, this sales obstacle of “I don’t do free” once again raised its tiresome head. One of our members who does corporate logo wear, Rick Gosser of Gosser Corp Sales, even created a T-Shirt for those who are tired of “I don’t do free.”

Isn’t it ironic that the very same small business owners who want to increase sales expect other small business owners to give them their solutions for free?  What’s with that?

The challenge is how do you as a small business owner overcome this sales obstacle?

Here are three quick tips to help overcome “I don’t do free.”

#1 – Establish Your Expectations

Possibly, the first step happens when you do provide something free.  Unless you stated your expectations up front, how does your ideal customer know anything different? This is the perfect time to let the customer know that if he or she is satisfied with your “freebie,” you expect at least 3 solid sales referrals.

#2 – Provide An Invoice

Just because you have something for free, does not mean it lacks a monetary value.  Send an invoice with the actual dollars you would have charged. Then show a courtesy or professional credit for the same amount. Additionally by issuing invoices for all of your “free” work, you can track if this marketing strategy is actually gaining you new business.

#3 – Schedule a Follow Up Meeting

When you provide the free solution or after you complete delivery of your free solution such as executive coaching or business coaching, schedule a follow-up meeting. Again, you are responsible to reduce the “I don’t do free” sales obstacle.

#4 – Just Say No with “Do You Do Free?”

Possibly the best way is to respond with the “free request” is to ask the other person “Do You Do Free?”  In some cases, the conversation may turn to bartering.  If this works for you, then that is your decision.  My experience bartering has become a code word for “free.”

Yes, the “I don’t do free” sales obstacle probably will never go truly away because of human nature. Small business owners who head this “I don’t do free” sales obstacle off at the business intersection will realize these two results:

  1. Decrease in “I don’t do free”
  2. Increase sales

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. She speaks and writes specifically to high performance sales people who require a tailored executive coaching solution and to small businesses with under 50 employees where the challenges are more unique and resources more limited. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

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Why Many Marketing Plans Fail Before They Start

Have you ever wondered why so many marketing plans fail?  In most instances, small business owners do not realize their possibly very expensive marketing  plan is already set up to fail before they execute their first action steps.

marketing-plans-fail

Why?

Here are five possible answers as to why marketing plans fail.

#1 – Marketing Plans Are Not Stand Alone Efforts

Marketing plans evolve from the research within the strategic plan.  To write an independent marketing plan without investing the time to do a thorough strategic action plan is probably the main reason marketing plans fail before they start.

#2 – Business Plans Are Not Strategic Plans

Some small businesses believe their business plans are enough of a foundation for an effective marketing plan. This is another fallacy given business plans are given to financial institutions for financing and lack the in depth internal and external appraisals within a strong strategic plan.

#3 – Confusion Between Marketing, Advertising and Social Media

Advertising and social media are marketing channels.  Unfortunately, many small business owners believe advertising usually paid and marketing are the same thing and they are not.  Small businesses can engage in marketing without ever having to buy paid advertising.

Social media is also a marketing channel and may not cost actual profit dollars. However social media does have a cost, that being of time.

#4 – No Sales Process

The sales process has three main components or what I call phases.  The first phase is marketing with the goal to make a friend and to be asked back. The second phase is selling with the third and final phase of keeping loyal customers.  All three phases work together. To engage in a marketing plan without having a solid sales process creates misalignment and further confusion. If you don’t have a sales process, you can:

Download the 3 Phase Sales Process

#5 – The Quick Fix Increase Sales Expectation

Marketing is not the quick fix especially if you have people and process problems. Even the best marketing plan that has evolved from a well written strategic plan will fail when there are people and process problems.

After working with small business owners who share their marketing plans with me. I can attest these 5 reasons are why the majority of marketing plans fail before they start.  My suggestion is to determine if your small business has any of these reasons before hiring that next marketing firm to create that potentially very expensive document; pay even more money for advertising to glossy brochures or fancy websites. You will be money ahead.

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Leanne Hoagland-Smith supports forward thinking leaders in bridging the gaps between the two problems restricting strategic business growth – people and processes. She speaks and writes specifically to high performance sales people who require a tailored executive coaching solution and to small businesses with under 50 employees where the challenges are more unique and resources more limited. Leanne can be reached at 219.508.2859 central time USA.  Follow her on Twitter or check out her profile on LinkedIn.

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How to Quickly Identify Top Sales Candidates

Some say selling is different today than yesterday.Whether this is true or untrue, small business owners still must hire top sales candidates quickly. With 97.7% of all U.S. businesses having under 20 employees, a bad hire is extremely costly. These small business owners with their limited resources also must adhere to EEOC guidelines or face some very ugly and expensive consequences.

top-sales-performersRecently in a discussion with one small business owner, he shared he had spent over $170,000 to hire several different salespeople and none of them could perform in spite of glowing resumes and referrals.  For him, salespeople had become a liability.

What truly separates top sales candidates from the rest of the resume pack is their motivation to be successful.  Identifying what motivates a person to sell is the starting point in the selection process.

The question then becomes this one:

How do I as a small business owner or sales manager separate these potential “hungry” top sales candidates from everyone else without the expensive hiring curve?

A Bit of History

Over 100 years ago, a German philosopher and psychologist, Dr. Eduard Spranger, published a book entitled Lebensformen. In 1928, his work was translated into English as Types of Men:the Psychology and Ethics of Personality. Spranger’s work identified 6 motivational dimensions or drivers:

  1. Aesthetic
  2. Economic
  3. Political
  4. Social
  5. Religious
  6. Theoretical

Then in the 1950′s Dr. Gordon Allport used Spranger’s works to further understand human nature. Allport rejected Freud’s psychoanalytic approach and placed more emphasis on the present than the past.  From Allport’s efforts, he and his team created an assessment measuring a person’s value hierarchy. This assessment has seven motivational dimensions or drivers:

  1. Aesthetic
  2. Altruistic (replaces Social)
  3. Economic
  4. Individualistic (Spranger’s addition)
  5. Political
  6. Regulator (replaces Religious)
  7. Theoretical

The Assessment

Many firms have taken this original assessment by Spranger and in some cases updated it.  These updates can be good or not so good depending upon the publisher.  The actual assessment usually has a series of statements in which the respondent has four choices and ranks them as most agree to least agree.

With some publishers as the Innermetrix Values Index, all four responses are ranked from most to least. The ranking of all four responses increases the accuracy by 35% over those where only two responses are ranked.  As to the time involved, usually 15-20 minutes for the respondent and 15 minutes to review the results per respondent.

One other factor to be considered is the validity and reliability of the assessment.  Since the assessment is inductive in nature and subjective, a good validity and reliability ranking is near .85.  What this means is out of 100 people, the assessment will correctly identify 85 people.

The Process to Identify Top Sales Candidates

After the initial applications have undergone a first screening, then the remaining candidates each receive the Values Index assessment. The goal here is to separate those with an economic driver in the top 50% of all dimensions.  Those with the economic dimension in the top 50% are probably more likely to be high performing top sales candidates. Yes, there will always be exceptions. This is why a second review of all employment application information should be undertaken before a final selection pool is made.

In working with clients, I have observed many salespeople with economic dimension in the lower 50% of all the dimensions. The motivational driver of altruism in some instances is number one or in the top 50%. What this suggests is this salesperson is very social, but lacks the driver to earn or close the sale. The result of the Values assessment can be measured against the current results of the salesperson.

The Benefit of Using the Values Assessment

By using the Values Index Assessment, small business owners or sales managers can quickly and affordably separate the wheat from the chaff so to speak.  As long as the hiring process is the same for all applicants, this assessment tool becomes a quick way to identify top sales candidates. Depending upon the vendor and the depth of the actual assessment, the investment ranges in from $15 to $50. Many vendors can train small business owners or sales managers to understand the basic fundamentals of the Values assessment especially if the publisher has provided additional information beyond the basic listing of the six or seven motivational dimensions.

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If you want to identify top sales candidates, then call Leanne Hoagland-Smith at 219.508.2859 (CST) to discuss the Values Index along with your other goals for strategic growth.

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